(Audio) Jump In #34: TVNZ’s Jason Paris

August 27th, 2008

We interview Marketer of the Year, TVNZ’s Jason Paris, about how TVNZ has transformed itself in the last few years, and how this large, historical organisation is experimenting with new media while maintaining the old.

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Mentioned in this episode:

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(Audio) Jump In #33: The Broadband Debate

August 27th, 2008

This Wednesday Simon will join many other speakers at the Digital Future Now summit, including our guests on this episode.

Bernard Hickey , Ernie Newman and Rob O’Neill will share a panel with Minister for Communications, David Cunliffe. This was their chance to talk behind his back!

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We had a very feisty – and pretty accurate – response from Ben Kepes on this one. Here it is:

Stuff that I disagree about

1)At 1?20" Bernard lists what broadband means for him – all of what he lists I can perform with dodgy DSL sited 5km from the nearest exchange, So the issue would not seem to be speed so much as general access
2) 3" 10 Bernard says we’re stuck with a 1970’s infrastructure which is plain wrong – if one looks at the speed and coverage increase over the past decade one can see that, while progress could definitely be better, we’re still ahead of many of our OECD competitors
3) At 3?20" Bernard says we need the biggest pipes we can get – I contend that in fact we need the widest spread pipes that we can get – we can supersize them once we have the coverage
4) Ernie says at 3?40" that Gen Y live their lives online which is a fact but a) how much of that is actually productive (there is a difference between surfing porn and providing some gain for the country and b) much of what Gen Y surfs isn’t overly bandwidth intensive – thus coverage rather than pipe size is key
5) Rob’s point re increasing bandwidth requirements for new media are valid to a point – but the cost vs speed is a very important issue that given our population and geography cannot be overlooked
6) Bernard’s comments at 7?00" re upload capacity would seem to be red herrings – has he looked at the offerings that give FLS both up and down which are already on the market in New Zealand
7) Bernard’s contention that hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders would be freed up to become digital business people if only they had sufficient speed is nothing without hard empirical evidence of the same. People bandy around claims of 10% productivity gains instantaneously with better broadband – that sort of claim demands empirical proof
8) At 9?20 Bernard claims that cloud software requires good pipe size – not correct – I use almost entirely cloud based services on a shonky connection over 5km from the nearest exchange
9) At 14?52" Bernard says that health, media and accounting would somehow move from monopolies to market services with better broadband. None of these services are particularly broadband dependant and using Xero as an example of a monopoly busting global business is just a muddied mixed and confused message
10) At 15?30" Rob uses his example of a "robotic accountant" – the example he gives is entirely do-able on even dial-up (or heaven forbid) voice
11) Bernard’s ridiculous assertion at 16?15" that one can’t transmit a 100 page document with anything other than massive pipes is plain wrong. He should try using Zoho some time to prove himself wrong. Also bizarre is his following assertion that a single cable across the Tasman is somehow a major risk for TradeMe (which is primarily a domestic service not requiring international connectivity).
12) At 19? Ernie uses online commerce as a reason for better broadband speeds and uses TradeMe as an example – sorry but TradeMe is perfectly accessible over dial-up so the TradeMe use case just doesn’t stack up

Don’t get me wrong – I’m all for better connectivity but we need to separate the coverage versus speed discussion – my contention is that widespread coverage is a much more important issue than higher speed

More here .

What do you think?

Also mentioned in this episode:

See the video version .

You can get the latest Jump In on your iPod or in your inbox every week. Subscribe here !

Hear other audio podcasts from iJump .

Too much information? Sign up for our fortnightly email newsletters and reduce the clutter.

Jump In #34: TVNZ’s Jason Paris

August 27th, 2008

We interview Marketer of the Year, TVNZ’s Jason Paris, about how TVNZ has transformed itself in the last few years, and how this large, historical organisation is experimenting with new media while maintaining the old.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6520260038212126364

(Can’t see the video above? See it at Yahoo , MySpace , Metacafe , Google , Revver , DailyMotion , Blip.tv and Viddler )

Mentioned in this episode:

And as always …
  • Want to hear it, not see it? Here’s the audio-only version
  • Subscribe to our audio version and Jump In while you’re on the run.
  • You can find more info and archives here .
  • And of course, we’d love to see your comments below.

Too much information? Sign up for our fortnightly email newsletters and reduce the clutter.

What causes bad customer service? (+ what makes Twitter special)

August 23rd, 2008

After Marie had some exceptionally bad customer service yesterday, I twittered the question "what causes bad customer service?"

What followed were some really insightful answers. I’ve added them below. Why blog about customer service on a blog about social media? Because social media has the potential to expose customer service holes in your organisations extremely fast (here’s an example ). And it also has the potential to improve it, if used for internal as well as external communications.


Is it the people or the systems that cause bad customer service?

I’ll step aside now and let my esteemed colleagues take up the thread:

Q: What causes bad customer service?

Ben Young : Lack of strategic focus on customers? Or just someone having a bad day. Or… they just don’t like you?

Rob Inskeep : I think it’s seperation from the customer. I’ve found in smaller organizations and groups it’s EASIER to care… …Perception of safety (anonymity?) in numbers perhaps…


Mr Judkins : I would say low staff morale, or having staff who are in a position which does not align with their strengths…


That’s a biggie! Even if the organisation has the best systems, it ultimately comes down to how that person feels and behaves towards you. The right person in the wrong job is the wrong person for the job.

Rachel Ah Kit : I think it’s lack of passion. If you have passion, you want the "share the love" and that translates to good service!


to which I added: "and I guess passion can only come when there’s a clear vision"

Rachel: definitely! I guess passion and vision go hand in hand!


Steven Kempton : too high expectations….

On reflection, I should’ve asked Steven whose expectations were too high – customers, or companies?

S Collings : not enough info at the finger tips and too many numbers to call / segmented support areas – VF/iHug etc

This is also a biggie, and Vodafone NZ is a good example. Mergers and acquisitions make great sense for the share price, but providing consistent experience with rapidly changing and evolving products can be costly and confusing for the people who have to deliver the service.

Neil Forster : Is it what, or who ? for some reasone when we design customer service, we forget to think how we’d like it as well.

Persoanlly I find "they" try to design for "the average"…so missing the "people"… I’m never me/seen "Mr/Mrs Average"

if at home, or in store, as a customer, would "you" put up with it. Most people who do this, when asked in my experiecne, say "nope" WTF


I jumped in and asked: "
or is it simply that the systems are under-designed? Or poorly designed?"

Rob Inskeep again: I think they are, if anything, overdesigned. The lack of flex disallows different use cases and expects 1 size fits all

empowering (and TRUSTING) staff to make the right decision to resolve a specific situation requires lots of staff training

Neil Forster again: Yup, under (designed) and poorly and in some cases "arrogantly"…the world of Cust. Experience is trying to change that, lets hope


Indeed! :)

Rob Inskeep: Providing rigid and inflexible rules does wonders for consistent service so the answer is the same each time, but quality..?

unfortunatly I can’t tell you. I think it’s a hard field as lessonplans *should* update to keep pace with environment..but..

..environments and businesses are changing so swiftly, it’s hard to keep reworking content and *still* turn a profit.

Rob’s hit an important nail on the head. More training is often needed, but the interesting question is, how to do that profitably. This is where can perhaps take some notes from companies like British Telecom, who’ve used social media to increase the speed and reduce the cost of learning in the organisation.

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links for 2008-08-11 [delicious.com]

August 11th, 2008

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Jump In #33: The Broadband Debate

August 11th, 2008

This Wednesday Simon will join many other speakers at the Digital Future Now summit, including our guests on this episode.

Bernard Hickey , Ernie Newman and Rob O’Neill will share a panel with Minister for Communications, David Cunliffe. This was their chance to talk behind his back!

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3162954582596292226

(Can’t see the video above? See it at Yahoo , MySpace , Metacafe , Google , Revver , Blip.tv , Veoh and Viddler )

We had a very feisty – and pretty accurate – response from Ben Kepes on this one. Here it is:

Stuff that I disagree about

1)At 1′20" Bernard lists what broadband means for him – all of what he lists I can perform with dodgy DSL sited 5km from the nearest exchange, So the issue would not seem to be speed so much as general access
2) 3" 10 Bernard says we’re stuck with a 1970’s infrastructure which is plain wrong – if one looks at the speed and coverage increase over the past decade one can see that, while progress could definitely be better, we’re still ahead of many of our OECD competitors
3) At 3′20" Bernard says we need the biggest pipes we can get – I contend that in fact we need the widest spread pipes that we can get – we can supersize them once we have the coverage
4) Ernie says at 3′40" that Gen Y live their lives online which is a fact but a) how much of that is actually productive (there is a difference between surfing porn and providing some gain for the country and b) much of what Gen Y surfs isn’t overly bandwidth intensive – thus coverage rather than pipe size is key
5) Rob’s point re increasing bandwidth requirements for new media are valid to a point – but the cost vs speed is a very important issue that given our population and geography cannot be overlooked
6) Bernard’s comments at 7′00" re upload capacity would seem to be red herrings – has he looked at the offerings that give FLS both up and down which are already on the market in New Zealand
7) Bernard’s contention that hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders would be freed up to become digital business people if only they had sufficient speed is nothing without hard empirical evidence of the same. People bandy around claims of 10% productivity gains instantaneously with better broadband – that sort of claim demands empirical proof
8) At 9′20 Bernard claims that cloud software requires good pipe size – not correct – I use almost entirely cloud based services on a shonky connection over 5km from the nearest exchange
9) At 14′52" Bernard says that health, media and accounting would somehow move from monopolies to market services with better broadband. None of these services are particularly broadband dependant and using Xero as an example of a monopoly busting global business is just a muddied mixed and confused message
10) At 15′30" Rob uses his example of a "robotic accountant" – the example he gives is entirely do-able on even dial-up (or heaven forbid) voice
11) Bernard’s ridiculous assertion at 16′15" that one can’t transmit a 100 page document with anything other than massive pipes is plain wrong. He should try using Zoho some time to prove himself wrong. Also bizarre is his following assertion that a single cable across the Tasman is somehow a major risk for TradeMe (which is primarily a domestic service not requiring international connectivity).
12) At 19′ Ernie uses online commerce as a reason for better broadband speeds and uses TradeMe as an example – sorry but TradeMe is perfectly accessible over dial-up so the TradeMe use case just doesn’t stack up

Don’t get me wrong – I’m all for better connectivity but we need to separate the coverage versus speed discussion – my contention is that widespread coverage is a much more important issue than higher speed

More here .

What do you think?

Also mentioned in this episode:

And as always …
  • Want to hear it, not see it? Here’s the audio-only version
  • Subscribe to our audio version and Jump In while you’re on the run.
  • You can find more info and archives here .
  • And of course, we’d love to see your comments below.

Too much information? Sign up for our fortnightly email newsletters and reduce the clutter.

(Audio) Jump In #32: Second Draw Down, part 3 (and moustaches)

August 2nd, 2008

Continuing the conversation with video podcasters Ludwig and Novia. (See part one and two ). Plus a bit of facial hair.

[display_podcast]

Novia and Ludwig’s top 5 (+2) tips for online video:

  1. Time
  2. Commitment
  3. Set
  4. Lighting
  5. Script
  6. Talent (very important)
  7. Sound

See the video version .

You can get the latest Jump In on your iPod or in your inbox every week. Subscribe here !

Hear other audio podcasts from iJump .

Too much information? Sign up for our fortnightly email newsletters and reduce the clutter.

Jump In #32: Second Draw Down, part 3 (and moustaches)

August 2nd, 2008
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6459407335924763798

Continuing the conversation with video podcasters Ludwig and Novia. (See part one and two ). Plus a bit of facial hair.

(Can’t see the video above? See it at YouTube , Yahoo , MySpace , Metacafe , Google , Revver , DailyMotion , Blip.tv , Veoh and Viddler )

Novia and Ludwig’s top 5 (+2) tips for online video:

  1. Time
  2. Commitment
  3. Set
  4. Lighting
  5. Script
  6. Talent (very important)
  7. Sound
And as always …

Too much information? Sign up for our fortnightly email newsletters and reduce the clutter.