iJumpTV 79: Does your work have meaning?

March 29th, 2010
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Does your work have meaning? If you run a company, is there meaning in every piece of work?

Equipped to Lead talks about how to create an organisation that treats every stakeholder – from staff to suppliers to management – as real humans with real needs.

What does this have to do with social media? Social media often acts as a window on an organisation. If a culture is unhealthy, that will come out. If the culture is healthy, and people are doing what they love, that will come out – through official and unofficial channels!

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iJumpTV 78: The Art of Engagement Book Review

March 22nd, 2010
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The word “engagement” gets thrown around a lot, especially in connection with social media. The Art of Engagement by Jim Hauden has nothing to do with social media, but everything to do with getting everyone on the same page.

Hauden’s company, Root Learning, helps companies engage their staff through collaborative drawings that then get transformed into paintings by professional artists. It’s a unique take on collaboration that overcomes a common communications problem: we say the same words, but mean different things!

How does this connect with social media? Social media has the potential to create the same kind of powerful collaboration, not through paintings but through photos, videos, wordles and other visual stimuli. And again – like last week’s iJumpTV – it comes back not to the technology but to the new skills we must learn.

Have you ever been in a situation where a drawing would have made the difference between success and failure?

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New Zealand’s most engaging websites

March 16th, 2010

This just in from Nielsen:

From the press release:

The rankings do not show which websites have the actual highest traffic numbers (ie total number of unique browsers) of this demographic, but instead show which websites have the highest percentage of their traffic consisting of people who have contributed to a message board, online forum or blog for the month of February. For example, publicaddress.net is the number one ranking because 54.6 percent of its unique browsers meet the demographic requirement, but their total number of matched unique browsers equals 8,556. gameplanet.co.nz on the other hand, in second place, has 50.9 percent of its unique browsers that meet the demographic requirement, but their total number of matched unique browsers equals 28,273.

To put these numbers into perspective, the proportion of overall New Zealand Internet users who say they have contributed to a message board, online forum or blog for the month of February is 30.8 percent.

These are fairly helpful stats, but they also miss out on the interaction going on off the site, using social media such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. Without getting into jargon (too much) it’s the difference between web 1.0 (all about the website) and web 2.0 (all about the connections between … well, everything).

On a related note, these stats show the intriguing, kind of symbiotic relationship between blogs and social media.

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Conversations that Matter with Toke Møller

March 16th, 2010
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Social media has great potential to change the way we do business, and even run countries. But technology alone won’t get us there. In this interview I talk with Toke Møller, one of the people involved in the Art of Hosting, a way of thinking about communication.

The Art of Hosting is a bit hard to describe briefly, so I asked Toke to sum it up. His reflections are quite profound, not only for how we “do” social media but also how we “do” life.

I’d love to hear what you think.

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Exciting events coming up in March and April

March 10th, 2010

If you want to learn about social media, you landed in the right time period!

Social media learning events coming up:

March 24th: Marie Workshops in Auckland

An intimate workshop for people new to social media. You’ll learn how to tweet, blog, Facebook and YouTube. Register here.

March 31st: Social Media 101 at The University of Auckland Short Courses

Get the 30,000 foot view of social media as it pertains to business – specifically your business. Register here.

April 7-9: Connect Now, Sydney, Australia

Featuring social media thought leaders from around the world and MC’ed by Simon Young, Connect Now is a major event for the Asia Pacific region. Together we’re exploring the future not just of marketing but of business. Register here and let us know you’ll be there!

Auckland Social Media Club – every month

Hear from others who are regularly using social media at the Auckland Social Media Club meetups, on the second Tuesday of each month. Keep in touch by becoming a fan on the Facebook page.

Find out what else is on and happening on the #sy social media consultancy events page.

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iJumpTV 76: put some play in your work!

March 9th, 2010
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Work needs more play – and not just because it makes people feel good. Play can make a person – and a company – more resilient, more creative and more innovative.

The Red Rubber Ball at Work does a great job of saying why play is important – from the points of view of many different people in business, from product designers to salespeople to Seth Godin.

For more information on play and its role in the growth cycle (from chaos to competence), see chapter one of the Jolt Challenge, an excellent book I’ve just finished. A review is coming your way soon!

Meantime, enjoy this review and I’d love to hear what you think!

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Latest artsy posts at The Big Idea

March 8th, 2010

Recently I’ve been guest posting at NZ’s arts hub The Big Idea about … what else … social media.

Read about how intention is shifting to social media, but not budget – and why I think that’s happening.

Find out how to get a job in social media.

And check out my contentious post about the Save Radio NZ Campaign. Deliberately provocative? Just to get a response? You decide.

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iJumpTV 75: Social media and Emotional Intelligence

March 1st, 2010
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I met Luke Grange in Melbourne last year at the Marketing Now Conference. He let me know about an exciting project connecting social media and the skills of emotional intelligence.

Find out more about the project, and the e-book Luke has co-written.

Also referenced in this interview:
The Cluetrain Manifesto (see www.cluetrain.com)

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iJumpTV 74: Great Speeches

February 22nd, 2010
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I love speeches – well, great ones at least. And Great Speeches for Better Speaking takes you on the inside of some of America’s best speeches: JFK’s inaugural address, Ronald Reagan’s state of the nation address following the Challenger disaster, and other lesser-known but equally powerful examples.

In this review I explore (among other things) the connection between oratory and social media – particularly the ability to persuade. It touches on issues covered by Clay Shirky in Here Comes Everybody – the idea that whether we like it or not, everyone has the ability to influence, whether they’re right or wrong.

The answer? An informed public. It’s going to be a better world if we all understand how persuasion works – whether it’s through a speech, or through a blog.

The author of Great Speeches also runs a website called AmericanRhetoric.com, which is a remarkable education resource.

In this review I also look back at another oratory-related review, Say it Like Obama. Who knows, maybe January 2011 will bring yet another book review about speech-making.

Also worth watching/listening: JFK, MLK and Winston Churchill run through autotune. Sounds like a joke, but I found it surprisingly touching!

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Roots of the revolution

February 10th, 2010

Guillotine_(PSF)In May 2009 I talked to some Otago University students about why social media is important – not just because it’s new technology, but because it’s a symptom and enabler of a massive social shift that’s happening.

Over the next few weeks I’ll delve into the roots of this revolution, but first it would pay to explain what this revolution actually is.

In the book “Dawn to Decadence”, historian Jacques Barzun defines a revolution as “the violent transfer of power and property in the name of an idea”. He goes on:
We have got into the habit of calling too many things revolutions. Given a new device or practice that changes our homely habits, we exclaim: “revolutionary!” But revolutions change more than personal habits or a widespread practice. They give culture a new face

In the book “Dawn to Decadence“, historian Jacques Barzun defines a revolution as “the violent transfer of power and property in the name of an idea”. He goes on:

We have got into the habit of calling too many things revolutions. Given a new device or practice that changes our homely habits, we exclaim: “revolutionary!” But revolutions change more than personal habits or a widespread practice. They give culture a new face.

Is this a time of violent transfer of power and property? Are we in genuinely revolutionary times?

Just ask the newspaper industry. Or the movie industry. Or music, or TV. There’s violence (financially speaking), and there’s transfer of power and property. And not all the news is bad, either.

But is it just technology driving this? No. There are a whole bunch of factors that have brought us where we are today. Starting soon, we’ll examine them in-depth.

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