Join the conversation about social media in New Zealand – on a plane!

December 17th, 2007

2111216863_173efbfd28_b.jpgI attended BarCamp Auckland this weekend, and got into a great conversation about the future of marketing.

One outcome: this week’s Jump In! is an interview with the 16-year-old organiser of BarCamp, Ludwig Wendzich.

Another outcome: a Facebook Group called Social Mediar, where you are most welcome to jump in and join the conversation.

Microsoft’s Nigel Parker has upped the stakes even more. I suggested we meet up in person – he said why not do it in a plane! Your password is… social.

See you on Facebook, in the air … or both.

(Photo by Zak Henry. See other BarCamp Auckland photos)

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Thanks, Idealog!

December 6th, 2007

Idealog has helped our fledgling video podcast along with a mention in its weekly e-newsletter.

If you haven’t heard of Idealog, please check it out! It’s where creativity meets innovation meets business meets technology – and much more!

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And stay tuned tomorrow for Dwayne Alexander, in a brief chat about reaching your goals and managing change.

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Who’s really in control?

November 22nd, 2007

If you haven’t already noticed, I ask a lot of questions. One morning as we were walking through Titirangi’s majestic bush scenery, we discovered a new track. We took our chances, walking and then stumbling through the steep track. I felt gravity pushing me like a bully, and soon gravity and I were in a wrestling match.

As I made my way to the office I couldn’t stop thinking about how much we like to think we’re in control. But we think we control far more than we actually do.

When you participate in social media, it’s like life. You don’t really have control of the outcome.

But any form of marketing where you do feel you have control is an illusion. The social media world is where your audience is increasingly going to be. These are people, with views, opinions, preferences – and a voice.

It’s your choice whether you engage with these people, or just remain in your illusion.  Here’s how Avis Uk has started to engage.

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Web 2.0 doesn’t have to be sexy

November 5th, 2007

Judging by the comments on Jon Beattie’s presentation on web 2.0, there’s still a sizeable gap between those in the know and the rest of the world.

One of my theories is that people still put blogging, podcasting etc in the “technology” part of their mind (which for some is a scary place). It should be in the “people” part (which is also scary, but part of our jobs).

Maybe I can do my bit today by debunking one thought – that web 2.0 has to be uber-cool and aimed at a youth audience. Two recent blogs show that to be wrong.

Can you think of anything less exciting than insurance and home buying? (Okay, getting a home is pretty cool, and I suppose getting an insurance payout is exciting – but paperwork is not fun at all!)

New Zealand companies are harnessing blogs, not to do anything especially new, but to get closer to their customers in a way they couldn’t before.

It’s not about whiz-bang technology – it’s about predictability and things working properly. It’s not about the coolest new thing – it’s about the most relevant. It’s not about who can get the most traffic to their blog – it’s about who can make the best connection with the people who do come.

This is a conversation-starter. Want to join the conversation? What do you think a blog is for?

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Wise dinosaur

October 31st, 2007

Watch this space for the iJump show. The iJump show is a video podcast showcasing marketers’ & consumers’ opinions about how they use social media in their personal lives and in their organisations.

My first guest was Keith Norris Chief Executive from Marketing Association. He was funny and refreshing despite being a self proclaimed dinosaur. There’s something about being given permission to ask questions. I find it liberating and enjoyable because you never know what we’ll learn about the person and how they perceive the world.

It’s a dream to talk to people about social media and get opinions. Afterall our opinions matter. Who’s listening? Can we afford not to? Marketers are now facing more media channels than ever before. They’ll eventually get their hands on our demographic and psychographic data through the many social media sites like facebook, myspace, bebo that we’re part of. And guess who’s driving this? You and me.

Tomorrow I talk with Toby Hilless Chief Manager Retail Marketing at ASB.

p.s if you want to be interviewed on iJump send us an email at marie [at] ijump.co.nz

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Our backyard

October 25th, 2007

We’ve been talking a lot to organisations who’ve shown interest in the new social media phenomena.

From the conversations we’ve had questions. Questions need answers. How do we provide answers for a phenomena that is new. One way is to experiment. Be curious. Ask lots of questions. Find out who is doing is what.

Here are a few questions we’ve been asked:

  • Where are we heading with this social new media phenomena as a society?
  • How would it change the way I communicate as a person?
  • How will this change the way we do business in the future?
  • Why should I blog?
  • Is it a phase?
  • Where do I find the time?
  • What are the risks of not getting involved?
  • How does my organisation make money from it?
  • What are the pro’s and con’s?

I decided to start a personal quest to find out the answers instead of trying to do my own research. Why not talk to one of our NZ universities and see what they think? what are they researching? what have they found that is beneficial for you?

I spoke to Dr Margo Buchanan-Oliver this morning at the University of Auckland Business School. I explained what iJump is about and in all honesty I didn’t know where to begin. Margo mentioned a monthly seminar which is held at the campus called Code which is multi-disciplinary. It combines both academic and commercially relevant research. It investigates how new digital technology is being used and can be used. And it explores the implications of such use within the practice of business.

In the next couple of months we’re share with you what their findings are.

We don’t have all the answers. But we’re prepared to jump to get them.

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